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Observing turbidity currents in the wild: New insights from direct field-scale measurements

Sep 28, 2020, 1:15 pm
MARUM Research Seminar
via ZOOM, re­gister with jtit­schack@marum.de

Michael Clare

Dur­ing the lim­ited mode of op­er­a­tion due to corona, the lec­tures are held vir­tu­ally via ZOOM. Please re­gister by con­tact­ing Jür­gen Titschack (jtit­schack@marum.de) to re­ceive the ac­cess link.

Avalanches of sediment in the ocean, called turbidity currents, are among the volumetrically most important sediment transport processes globally. Due to their fast speeds, turbidity currents can break critical infrastructure, and transport organic carbon, nutrients and pollutants far into the deep-sea, thus sustaining deep-sea ecosystems. Until recently, we have largely had to rely on the deposits that they left behind or small-scale flows held 'captive' in the laboratory to understand turbidity currents. New developments in technology now enable detailed and direct measurements of powerful flows at field scale to complement these studies. Here, I will present recent measurements gathered by a large collaboration of researchers from a range of shallow to deep-marine settings worldwide that provide new insights into the internal anatomy of these these flows, how they initiate, evolve and interact with the seafloor. 

 

Michael Clare
Michael Clare
Michael Clare