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Daniel Ar­turo Saavedra Hor­tua

Institution: Leib­niz Cen­ter for Trop­ical Mar­ine Re­search (ZMT), Bre­men
Room: ZMT, room 5203
Phone: +49 421 23800 - 179
E-mail: [Bitte aktivieren Sie Javascript]
Other webpage(s): Daniel's ZMT web page

 

 
GLOMAR Research Theme C
 

PhD project

Exploring carbon dynamics in connected mangrove forests and seagrass beds: how important is it?

 The overall goal of this research is to enhance understanding of carbon cycling in connected ecosystems of the tropical coastal seascape; mangrove forests and seagrass beds. At the landscape scale we want to establish the physical, biological and chemical drivers of spatial distribution of carbon sequestration, carbon supply and carbon dioxide (CO2) release from the sediment.

To achieve this we will monitor sites in four different global regions to gain an in-depth understanding of how carbon cycling changes across global latitudes. Field sites will be in Florida (America), Zanzibar (Africa), Singapore (Asia) and Adelaide (Oceania). This line of research is of upmost importance as there are large knowledge gaps in the global database of carbon cycling in connected mangrove forests and seagrass beds. In addition, future understanding of CO2 release from mangrove and seagrass sediment is vital for understanding how the tropical coastal seascape may affect the global carbon cycle with climate induced temperature increases.

Teasing apart the variables, which may alter carbon accumulation and CO2 release, could be used in valuing ecosystems and their services, and will hence support ecosystem-based management. It is therefore vital to gain an understanding of carbon cycling from mangrove forests and seagrass beds at different latitudes.

This project aim to answer the following questions:

  1. What is the role of connected mangrove forests and seagrass beds vs. isolated ecosystems in carbon supply, quantity of carbon and the source of carbon?  How do functional traits of ecosystem engineers (mangrove trees and seagrass beds) change across connected and isolated systems, and is this connected to the supply, quantity and source of the carbon?
  2. Will CO2 release change across tropical latitude gradients or at the regional scale (i.e. connected and isolated ecosystems) and how is this related to carbon accumulation in the surface sediment?

Thesis committee

Prof. Dr. Martin Zimmer University of Bremen and Leib­niz Cen­ter for Trop­ical Mar­ine Research (ZMT), Bre­men
Dr. Lucy Gillis Leib­niz Cen­ter for Trop­ical Mar­ine Research (ZMT), Bre­men
Dr. Mirta Teichberg Leib­niz Cen­ter for Trop­ical Mar­ine Research (ZMT), Bre­men
Prof. Dr. Thorsten Dittmar Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM), Oldenburg